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sharminaktersss3435
Apr 02, 2022
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New technology can be intimidating for even the most confident employees. After all, a new tool or software can instantly disrupt the day-to-day workplace that employees rely on. Managers who have successfully transitioned their teams to new technologies know that providing clear communication, creating complete documentation, and establishing opportunities for continuous learning are key to helping employees adapt. If you're a manager preparing to introduce new technology to your team, you can use the steps outlined in this article to help your team make the adjustment smoothly. Step 1: Be transparent about what's coming When employees understand exactly what is happening and why, they can manage change more easily. In the absence of clear information, rumors and anxiety can start to spread. Before rolling out new technologies, managers should communicate clearly and transparently how the changes will affect employees and why they are being implemented. This approach has two main benefits: It provides an opportunity to build trust and set the tone . Employees are more likely to trust companies that demonstrate transparency. "Change is a great opportunity to exercise transparency," wrote Kissmetrics founder Neil Patel . " Be candid about how you've changed your business model, your prices, your leadership, your product, or anything else. You publicly declare The fact of the change is as important as the change itself.” In addition to earning employee respect, transparent communication can set a positive tone for employees to adapt to change . Managers who don't take the opportunity to create a climate of excitement about how new technology can improve the workplace are more likely to fall victim to a climate of frustration or skepticism about new technology. By sharing as much clear, honest information with your employees as possible, you can quell fears about the future while industry mailing list about new technologies in the workplace. Step 2: Include employees in the selection process Too often, companies invest in new technology without consulting the people who will most likely use it. Including individual contributors in the technology selection process is an underrated step in the successful introduction of new technology. This makes sense. After all, individual contributors understand the day-to-day pain points in their work better than anyone else and are well placed to advise on how technology can help them work faster and more accurately. In a report on implementing new technologies , Harvard Business Review recommends selecting a committee of employees affected by process changes. These employees can research available options and review possible solutions to find a method that maximizes benefits while minimizing workflow disruption. By welcoming the insights of your employees, you can avoid significant financial and time investments in tools that don't fit your company's needs. Step 3: Create a complete FAQ document Any major change in workflow can create a lot of problems. Despite the best intentions, problems can lead to misinformation and confusion if employees do not have a reliable source of information. New technology often sparks a game of phone calls, where a well-meaning employee asks questions and shares information with colleagues, who then share information further. Before long, forgotten details or misunderstandings can lead to serious confusion. Instead, managers should create FAQ documents that thoroughly address key questions employees will ask, such as: Why introduce new technology How to choose new technology Detailed instructions on how to complete the task Additionally, managers should maintain open communication with individual contributors and update the FAQ document weekly to address new issues that arise over time. For example, the growing popularity of peer-to-peer payment applications could lead companies to offer new payment methods. FAQs can use text and screenshots to guide employees through how they use the apps for everyday tasks or special projects. Ensuring all employees access the same, accurate information reduces confusion and helps employees adapt more quickly to new technology. Step 4: Reward curiosity and healthy skepticism In addition to problem solving, managers should also pay attention to the kinds of questions being asked. While some skeptical rhetoric can be safely ignored and even damage morale, others can actually help drive better outcomes. If you manage any employees you consider "flying risks", they may just be your secret sauce for implementing new technology. One of the most common types of flying risk employees are high achievers who are easily bored or lured elsewhere by better opportunities. You can help these employees direct their restless, questioning energies to reviewing new technology and workflows, rather than stressing about when your high-achieving flight risks may leave. New technologies provide an opportunity to re-engage employees who need to take on new challenges while developing their critical thinking skills. By encouraging healthy skepticism and questioning, you can optimize your workflow to its most effective form. Step 5: Hire employees with technical skills While employees may be concerned that your company might hire techies to replace them, the reality is that technologists are often needed to help businesses successfully adopt new technologies. Depending on the type of technology your company invests in, you may need to hire people with technical expertise on a permanent or temporary basis.
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